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Section II: Those Who Administer the Charity

Firstly: Defining Those Who Administer Charity
Those who administer charity are those given the responsibility of its collection from the people by the ruler.
Secondly: Those Who Administer Charity as an Avenue of Its Expenditure
Those who administer charity are one of its avenues of expenditure. Consensus has been quoted on this by: Ibn al-Mundhir, Ibn Hazm, Ibn Qudamah, and Ibn Taymiyyah.
Thirdly: The Categories of Those Who Administer Charity
Those who administer charity [925] Those who administer charity – based on concurrent standards – include institutions and organisations responsible for it, and their relevant bodies responsible for collecting charity from the wealthy and sharing out among the poor according to legal standards. This is the decision of the International Fiqh Academy as part of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation. They are trustworthy, such that the charity wealth is preserved with them unless in the case of forceful abduction or carelessness. The one giving charity has absolved his responsibility by giving it to them. Hanbalis have explicitly mentioned this, and it is the decision of the Islamic Fiqh Academy as part of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, as well as being legally advised by the fourth symposium held for modern legal charity matters. are categorised into three:
The first category: are the collectors. Those are the ones whom the ruler gave the responsibility to travel across the land and sea to collect charity from its owners.
The second category: are the caretakers who preserve the wealth of charity collected.
The third category: are those who share it out among those who legally deserve it.
Fourthly: If the Administrator is Wealthy
The one who administers charity is given from it even if he is wealthy. Consensus has been quoted on this by: Ibn `Abd al-Barr, al-Kasani, and al-Buhuti.
Fifthly: The Amount Taken by the Administrator
The administrator is given the amount of a wage unconditionally. This is the position of the majority: Malikis, Shafi`is, and Hanbalis. [926] It is permissible for the Hanbalis that the ruler sends someone without a contract and then gives him a gift later, and if he wishes he may contractually agree a certain amount, and if he wishes, he may set a condition based on a particular action, such that if the worker accomplishes it, he deserves the amount.
Sixthly: Bonuses
It is not permissible to gift extra money to the administrators of charity, as all that is gifted is for status. Consensus has been quoted on this by Ibn `Abd al-Barr and Ibn Raslan.


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